UK employers expect treasury professional skills shortage

skills shortage

A survey of UK employers finds that 38% anticipate facing skills shortages when looking to recruit treasury professionals in the second half of 2016.

Professional recruitment specialist Robert Walters, which polled 425 hiring managers across the UK, also found that 24% of survey respondents believe these shortages will be exacerbated by Brexit while 74% plan to recruit mid-level professionals into treasury functions.

Commenting on the firm’s latest Recruitment Trends Survey, Lynley Hall, senior consultant, treasury recruitment, Robert Walters said: “With employers coming to recognise the value of highly skilled treasury professionals and the importance of recruiting the best staff into these roles, competition for top talent is intensifying.

“Britain’s decision to leave the European Union (EU) has triggered further demand for treasury specialists due to the declining value of the pound, as businesses look to mitigate risk around hedging funds and currency exchange.”

As the perceived value of treasury departments increases, employers are keen to recruit professionals at a mid-management level who possess the technical and management skills to oversee projects relating to changes in legislation.

In addition, treasury specialists who can demonstrate sound commercial awareness and play an active role in guiding the business’ financial strategies are highly sought after.

“In the past, strong technical skills were the main quality employers sought in treasury professionals,” added Hall. “However, the emphasis is shifting and employers are increasingly seeking out treasury specialists who can demonstrate strong commercial awareness and insight as well as technical proficiency.”

“In particular we have seen high demand for mid-level professionals as employers look to replace staff who are being promoted from middle management roles into more senior positions, as well recruiting interim treasury managers while permanent staff are seconded to other areas to gain experience.”

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